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In The Making

Learning To Print From A Home Studio

25th April, 2019

(Please hit ‘Visit Site’ to see this article in a less messy blob of words).

Know what is funny, I sometimes catch myself getting really overwhelmed when I realise that I’m actually putting action into one of my very, very long term goals. When I see myself actually DOING rather than heading off into the clouds and dreaming. I freak out! Holy crap, I think to myself, I’m actually creating a brand, actually started a small online business and now. NOW, I’m freaking printing my photography!

Such a stark contrast to how I use to be. Some of us just takes a little longer than others. I had to shift deeply seeded mindsets society placed on us “older” folks that everything has to be achieved at a certain age. Screw that! I don’t want to waste my time wondering and waking up when it is actually all too late.

I have never been a goal setter, maybe that was part of the problem? As a result I don’t know how to reward myself with the small wins I have been making and if you have any suggestions on how to do this, please feel free to let me know in the comments section.

Right! Go get yourself a cuppa.

chamomile tea is a wonderful calming beverage

Printing from a home studio has been such a big game changer! The challenges I had to face were, of course frustrating. I was a little naive when I thought all I had to do was just stick in the paper and the printer do it’s thing. Hey, this thing does have “advanced technology” and one usually assumes it will do most of the work for you.

Wrong.

I decided to buy some really cheap (and kinda nasty) A3 size photo paper to do some big photo print testing. I excitedly rip the packaging open and place a sheet into the printer. Head back over to my computer, tweak a few of my floral photos and hit [Print].

We generally assume when we see a photo on the screen it is going to come out the way it does in print. I’m here to tell you, no, it does not.
Which is why by adding a little more brightness and lifting out some shadows on screen will help with the outcome.
I also like to add a little bit more of saturation to the colours before printing it out. On the screen it might look quite intense.

Of course, I hit a few snags.

learning from mistakes when printing your photography
learning from mistakes when printing your photography

Yes. Those are scratches! Scratches made by the printer and the ink look really awful. AWFUL I tell you!
I was really disheartened and wondered why wasn’t it printing like it was on the smaller A4 size paper I have been testing with.

Um, hello Ms Jemini, this ain’t a normal printer. A voice chimed in.
This is a printer for professional photo reproduction!
One forehead slap later and I’m reading the manuals online.
See, when it comes to something new, I’m like a kid with a shiny new toy who only wants to play with it straight away.

Who reads manuals!? Pfffff…

how to optimise your image before printing

After reading some of the manuals online and watching a couple of youtube videos two things happened:

1) I realised I needed to slow down (again).

And

2) A reminder that knowledge is power.

Once I figured out what I needed to do…

learning to print from a home studio

Out comes a scratch free and no weird pixelated ink print comes out.

Incredible.

I quietly hug by printer and whisper, “Let’s not fight again.”

So!

Before you print look through the below Check List first:

Ms Jemini's before you print checklist

Hello! & Welcome to my quiet and wonderful corner of the internet.

© 2019 Ms Jemini
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